Escaping the Dark Closet of Suicide Grief

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May 15-17 is the National Weekend of Prayer for Faith, Hope and Life, designated as a time to pray for those like me who have survived the suicide death of someone we care about. Find my reflections on opening the door to grief at The Perennial Generation.

Today’s Biblical ‘Bucket List’ for COVID 19

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Maybe it’s just me, but I like having a “bucket list.”

Every year, instead of making resolutions, I make a bucket list of goals to give my year meaning and purpose. That way, I know what I want to get done, not what I’m going to strain to avoid doing. And I also know, on a given day, that I can choose among a whole bunch of things I care about accomplishing. Some have deadlines. Many call for weekly progress. But they’re goal focused, not deprivation focused. And that makes it much easier for me to keep going toward the purposes that give my life meaning.

Indoor enjoyment. Image by khamkhor from Pixabay
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The Beautiful Burls in My Brain

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Science teaches us that our life experiences are reflected in changing brain structures. Trauma creates enduring damage, they believe, even over multiple generations, but our brain’s ability to continue changing (“neuroplasticity”) can help us find recovery to a “healthy” brain norm.

But what if the way that distressing experiences affect us is more akin to growing protective burls in our brains? If that’s the case, trauma may make us unfit for cheap, ordinary use but ultimately far more valuable in the hands of those who know how to work with our unusual beauty.

The artist who created this astonishing burlwood bowl used semiprecious turquoise and malachite in resin to fill cracks and splits in the original wood. Image from Pinterest; artist unknown.
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How Will COVID Change Us?

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Clutter is Good Again: Finding Security in the Stuff We’re Saving

Last week, I was talking with a younger friend (via Zoom, of course) about how COVID 19 might change our lives going forward. The changes are likely to be big: many expect the impact on Americans now living might compare to the impact of the Great Depression or World War II.

Extreme thrift is one of the habits Americans in those generations learned.

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COVID-19 Grief: Finding Meaning As We Find Our Footing

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The COVID-19 pandemic is challenging our language about emotional distress. Some see a co-occuring epidemic of “mental illness” in a tidal wave of anxiety and depression crashing over our world. Others suggest we are experiencing something more profound … more human … and more ordinary,

Grief washes through our lives in waves that are as different as a tsunami surge and a wind-lapped puddle. The waves of grief ultimately land on the shore that defines our life’s meaning. Image by Martin Winkler from Pixabay
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A Slower, Sustainable Pace: My Bipolar Road Less Traveled

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For some people, sleeping and waking at odd hours makes no difference. But I learned by experience that I need to go to bed and wake up at the same hours every day of the week all year round … no matter what wonderful opportunity I would have to forego.

Some of us are tortoises. And that’s really all right. Image by skeeze from Pixabay
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